Stone of Peace

 

 

I wished upon a stone so blue

I whispered love, return to me

Then I threw it, and it flew

Across the waves, down to the sea

 

I whispered love, return to me

When geese fly south in feathered Vs

Across the waves, down to the sea

Soft winds sigh with my pleas

 

When geese fly south in feathered Vs

Then might war end and cease to be

Soft winds sigh with my pleas

Why can’t we learn how to agree?

 

Then war might end and cease to be

More guns, more hate is not the way

Why can’t we learn how to agree?

Why must we blame them and they?

 

More guns, more hate is not the way

No need for thundering cannons’ rattle

Why must we blame them and they?

In sorrow, I watched you leave for battle

 

On that bright, smooth shore, I stood awhile

Then I threw it, and it flew,

I thought reflected there I saw your smile

As I wished upon a stone so blue

 

This poem is a Pantoum in response to Jane Dougherty’s poetry challenge using the photo above and these words: Bright, smooth, shore, blue, reflecting. A Pantoum is a series of quatrains with the second and fourth lines becoming the first and third lines in the next quatrain. The first line of the poem becomes the final line, and the third line of the poem becomes the second line of the final quatrain. First and third lines rhyme, and second and fourth lines rhyme. Got it?  Here is a better description.

 

 

 

 

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36 thoughts on “Stone of Peace

  1. You are indeed a wizard with words and rhymes, Merril.

    When I saw the title and then the photo, I immediately thought of the stones of remembrance, an ancient Jewish tradition with roots in the Old Testament stories of Abraham, Moses and others. I don’t believe they were colored though. I imagine you know a thing or two about such stones.

    • Thank you, Marian.
      Your biblical knowledge is vastly superior to mine. I don’t really know anything about such stones, except there is a tradition of leaving stones on Jewish graves, but I’ve never done it.

  2. You answered the challenges found in words given beautifully, Merril.
    Your photo reminds me of all the times we carried buckets in the beach gathering smooth, glossy rocks and pretty beach glass. I believe the geese in a V makes a peaceful sight along with a sign of “solidarity.”
    I agree, why must people be divisive using differences instead of similarity? They and them should never be used to talk about others in a derogatory manner. How many years must pass before war is a subject of the past?❤

  3. Excellent Pantoum. I teach these in my creative writing classes – it’s a poem that seems ‘accessible’ to those who think they can’t write poetry, and then through this structure, realize how powerful poetry can be – and that they can be a poet too. This one is so full of thought, emotion, nuance and pain.

  4. Pingback: Poetry challenge Pebbles: the entries – Jane Dougherty Writes

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