The Splendor of Light

the_story_of_the_sun_moon_and_stars_1898_14778865395By Internet Archive Book Images [No restrictions], via Wikimedia Commons

 

She laughs and flames shoot from her chariot

moving through the sky. She will carry it,

(the splendor of light), and with lariat

she’ll rein in her gilded steeds, ferry it,

the glow, from dawn to dusk with merry wit.

 

She brings joy, life, pulses to beautify.

Her companion stars though, she sees them cry,

their tears shoot out, then streak across the sky.

Still she laughs, shares her light, as she rides by.

Someday she’ll fade, turn black–and then she’ll sigh.

 

This is a response of sorts to Jane Dougherty’s non-challenge.

Jane found the rather strange image above. It’s supposed to be a sunspot, and it comes from an 1898 book called The Story of the Sun, the Moon, and the Stars. I started thinking about sunspots, and then this story that I read recently about an unusual star that pulses and behaves erratically. I started thinking about what could cause this, and naturally I concluded the star pulses when it laughed. In honor of Jane, the poem is two stanzas of her Fifty Poetry Form (Does that make it a one hundred?): five lines of ten syllables each, with the last word of each line rhyming.

 

 

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24 thoughts on “The Splendor of Light

    • Hahaha. No, Susan, but thank you. Though I admire her, I don’t picture her as a sun goddess. But it was written as an antidote to my frustration with DT’s supporters. As I said, I simply pictured the sun’s activity was a result of laughter. The image made me happy. 🙂

  1. Reblogged this on Deuxiemepeau- Picturing Poetry by D. B. Donnelly and commented:
    Midway through this weekend’s migraine madness I realised I hadn’t done a Sunday Sharing in a long time therefore, as I can’t get through the fussiness to my brain, I thought I’d share the beauty of others instead…
    Todays first Sunday Sharing comes from Merril D. Smith and this beauty inspired by Jane Dougherty from Jane Dougherty Writes entitled The Splendour of Light.
    Check out more of Merril’s wonderful words by clicking the link or at http://www.merrildsmith.wordpress.com

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