Wishes

512px-Winslow_Homer_-_Moonlight,_Wood_Island_Light

 

From the sea, she walks ashore, seal-skin slips

from her body–she stands now unadorned–

shimmering hair unbound and flowing,

dulse-laced and glowing, she whips

it ‘round like armor. Girded thus, the sea foresworn

yet she lingers, soul unsure, not quite captured

by the sunlight, body gleaming, hair sheened by salt-sea blowing,

directed then by lover’s shouts, she turns, enraptured.

 

But rapture does not last, not when the sea sighs and calls

in waves that beckon with infinite ebbs and flows

with subaqueous whispers from afar–

till finally, she must flee the confining walls,

let loose her hair and shed her clothes

to rush upon the sea-kissed sand,

fur-pelt in hand, she makes one wish upon a star,

and embraces the sea, abandons land.

 

For De’s prompt at dVerse on mermaids and selkies. I rewrote a poem I did a while ago for one of Jane’s prompts and added a second stanza. I kept the rhyme scheme, but didn’t quite follow the rest for a san san poem. So, here goes—no minimalism here, this one’s unabashedly romantic.

 

 

 

 

 

61 thoughts on “Wishes

  1. Lovely. A Selkie. I think they’re more interesting than mermaids who don’t have a good reputation, temptresses, bringing death to honest sailors. The usual, blame the woman stuff 🙂 The language is magical.

  2. “ with subaqueous whispers from afar–

    till finally, she must flee the confining walls,

    let loose her hair and shed her clothes

    to rush upon the sea-kissed sand” So beautiful Merril !!

  3. Rene beat me to it… this was marvellous and beautiful and romantic.
    I remember reading a book where the selkie was male and it was sexy as hell (kind of like Ann Rice made vampires sexy). Damned if I can remember the title, though. I thought it was The Selkie but there are so many out there! Which one?

  4. I had not heard of male selkies, that would conjure many twists and vibes. Your selkie’s tail/tail is lovely, sensual and very romantic, As legends go, a selkie does not usually return to the sea until her human lover has died.

    • Thank you, Glenn! The selkie in the Childe Ballad is male, but the selkie in The Secret of Roan Inish is female, (and she does go back to the sea before her human lover dies from what I remember).

  5. I love a good selkie story, and this is great. I love that she kept control of her sealskin – such power in her choices. I like your use of form, as well – there’s an acceleration in the second stanza that works really well.

  6. A beautiful selkie poem, Merril, that flows like her unbound hair. I especially love the lines:
    ‘yet she lingers, soul unsure, not quite captured
    by the sunlight, body gleaming, hair sheened by salt-sea blowing’
    and
    ‘…waves that beckon with infinite ebbs and flows
    with subaqueous whispers from afar’.
    I’m relieved that she returned to the sea.

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