For All the Voyagers and All the Voyages

Corot, Jean-Baptiste-Camille; Seascape with Figures on Cliffs; The National Gallery, London

At dawn my thoughts of you float
from my ship, and to the waves, in spindrift lift
and sparkle, caught on gannet wings and carried–
to you, my love, to you–

across the miles, far from windswept water,
and though each day I travel farther,
I look for you on rising mountain-clouds,
and hear your voice in the wind’s chilled chatter,

telling me to bundle-tight. At night,
I rest my love on feathered down,
but sharp quills prick and write all around
my words of longing, “I want to be with you,”

to connect our heartbeats once again.
And so, I whisper questions across the knotted sea,
for the silvered-light to answer, then hear the moon’s reply,
be patient for what will come and what will end.

Your breath flows out, on a heron’s back it soars,
and hers rise on another to meet halfway–or more–
your souls may touch somewhere in space
in mist, a clinging trace–

though your bodies wait and wait, your thoughts send–
before forever, you’ll touch again.

For dVerse, where I’m hosting today. A work in progress. So many ways I could have gone with connection.

69 thoughts on “For All the Voyagers and All the Voyages

  1. A beautiful love poem, Merril, that moves like a ship on waves; I love the ‘sparkle, caught on gannet wings’ and the alliteration in the wind’s ‘chilled chatter’.

  2. I love what you’ve done with this, Merril. A poem expressing the kind of love which never dies:
    ‘I look for you on rising mountain-clouds,
    and hear your voice in the wind’s chilled chatter,’

    I especially like the final promise:
    ‘though your bodies wait and wait, your thoughts send–
    before forever, you’ll touch again.’

  3. My goodness this is utterly breathtaking, Merril! 💝 Especially love; “I rest my love on feathered down, but sharp quills prick and write all around my words of longing.” Sigh. how I feel the emotions in this! 😍😍 Thank you for the glorious prompt!

  4. Luv the image that thoughts can float –
    “across the miles, far from windswept water,”
    – Keeping the lovers in touch

    Thanks for dropping by to read mine

    Much💖love

  5. Tis a love poem, and it has a classical feel to it, connecting both with nature and the human heart and soul. I like the sneaky way you moved from first person narrator to third person, shifting to God’s eye perhaps.

  6. So … today I went on a voyage of your writings.
    There is much to praise in your work, your words. Praise it I do.
    Yet, every so often… here … there … something rings a poetic truth, known to a few.
    “… And the hour between dusk and night, dawn and day”…
    In film these 2 hours are called the “magic hours”.
    It is a time when the camera captures special shots… magic shots … shots that make make one famous.
    Your words are a camera. It has captured the magic hour.

  7. We attach our yearnings to the elements, to those with wings– and I think they do carry the threads to the object of our thoughts. The language you use is both ancient and timeless. (K)

  8. kaykuala

    though your bodies wait and wait, your thoughts send–
    before forever, you’ll touch again.

    Wonderful love poem Merril. It fills a void to be connected in such trying times and still hoping for good things in the close.

    Hank

  9. The power of love to cross oceans and days. It is an amazing feeling to love another so deeply.
    These lines spoke to me most,
    “And so, I whisper questions across the knotted sea,
    for the silvered-light to answer, then hear the moon’s reply,
    be patient for what will come and what will end.”
    Thank you for sharing this.

  10. a tender classical love poem reaching out over the seas … like the weaving of flight in this one, ‘wings’, ‘feathers’, ‘herons’! Very reminiscent of life before high tech

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