A Laugh Wings

A laugh wings–
flies through memories and
dreams. Sings like a mockingbird, repeats
again, imprinted in our minds, within our genes–
well, who’s to say? We remember a
glance, words said—heart-haunted—
we grasp, hold.

For Colleen’s Tanka Tuesday, I’m trying a triquain, a form I found on Shadow Poetry. “The Triquain, created by Shelley A. Cephas, is a poem with several creative variences and can be a rhyming or non-rhyming verse. The simpliest form is a poem made up of 7 lines with 3, 6, 9, 12, 9, 6, and 3 syllables in this order.” [Misspellings in original.]

My Mom had the best laugh.

I’m also linking this to dVerse, Open Link Night, where Grace is hosting.

Flickering

Glow  (July 2020)

A field of grass by an ugly gravel parking lot, transformed by sunlight. ©️Merril D. Smith 2020

 

Light

comes, goes,

so it flows

to earth and sea,

flaming grassy meadows,

with photons streaming, gilds a tree.

Though shadows loom below, we let them be;

pretend we do not see the coming of the night,

but live, walk, talk—and love, the apogee

of our beings—humanity

with stardust traces glows

but faintly—see?

The flickers

dim. . .grow

bright.

 

This is a diatelle for Colleen’s Tanka Tuesday. This week she wrote:

“Let’s make this challenge truly a poet’s choice! Use any syllabic poetry form that you’d like. As long as there are syllables to count, you’re good to go! Be creative. If your form is something new, teach us how to write it. Have fun!”

I know she doesn’t normally do rhyming forms, but this is definitely syllabic, and I know Colleen likes shapes, so I hope this is OK. 😀 Mine can probably use some more work, but I’m posting it anyway.


I found the form, created by Bradley Vrooman, on Shadow Poetry.  

“The Diatelle is a fun, syllable counting form like the etheree with a twist. The syllable structure of the diatelle is as follows: 1/2/3/4/6/8/10/12/10/8/6/4/3/2/1, but unlike an ethere, has a set rhyme pattern of abbcbccaccbcbba. This poetry form may be written on any subject matter and looks best center aligned in a diamond shape.”

Maybe everyone does this, but if not, maybe it’s helpful to see. I made myself a template to keep track of syllable/lines and rhymes. I do this for many forms.

a1 Light

b2 comes, goes

b3 so it flows

c4 to earth and sea

b6 flaming grassy meadows–

c8 with photons streaming, gild a tree

c10 though shadows loom below, we let them be,

a12 pretend we do not see the coming of the night

c10 but live, walk, talk–and love, the apogee

c8 of our beings–humanity

b6 with stardust traces glows

c4 but faintly—see?

b3 The flickers

b2 dim, grow

a1 bright.

Up and Down

© 2020 Frank J. Tassone

 

We stand on a precipice, nation and world. Fissured by plague and threats to democracy, we are faltering, close to tumbling into an abyss. Is this the beginning of the end? Or merely a ripple in the waves of time? I leave the angry and weary voices to walk, looking for beauty in the bright colors around me. A chipmunk scurries by. Deer shyly graze, turkeys strut through the long grass, and blackbirds give a trilling chink as they fly overhead.

I watch the sun rising over the river, making it sparkle. It know it’s physics, but I can also see the magic. We need both.

 

bare branches turn green,

brown leaves fall into river–

past floats to future

 

F9A07115-F532-4266-AF85-B5C8005CA8AC

©️Merril D. Smith 2020

A Haibun for Colleen’s Tanka Tuesday Haibun prompt, using Frank Tassone’s photo at the top for inspiration, and my photo at the end.

 

 

 

Shifted Sands

IMG_1062

Ocean City, NJ June 2020

 

Great women

often forgotten,

and their marks

tide-shifted

till their footprints are erased–

still their ghosts whisper

 

murmuring

with knowledge we’ve lost,

unseen and

swept away,

their hidden figures buried

in the sands of time.

 

A double shadorma  for Colleen’s tanka Tuesday challenge. Pat R.’s theme asked us to consider Longfellow’s “Psalm of Life” poem and/or use it as a source of found poetry. Well, you can see what that poem does to me. 😏

At Midnight

Textiles_from_Tibet,_18th-century_art,_Silk_chuba_detail,_-_MET_TP534A_(cropped)

 

At Midnight

 

gather

moonbeams and weave

a tapestry of light

to hang upon the wall of night,

glowing,

 

wait for

dawn’s chariot

to drive across the sky.

Collect her rays in blankets for

cold hearts.

 

Listen

for crow’s wisdom,

squirrel’s scolding, and frog’s croak.

Hear the joy in a baby’s laugh,

find peace

 

and watch

for storms on seas

of tumbling, tossing waves,

leaving you adrift. Here you find

dragons–

 

fire

streams from their mouths–

yet you must stay calm, sing

the song of sun, moon, stars, sea–

exhale

 

glowing

dawn’s chariot,

squirrels scolding, and frog’s croak,

the song, of sun, moon, stars, sea—

behold.

 

Colleen sort of challenged me to write a garland cinquain, so here it is. For her Tanka Tuesday challenge. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Any War, Every War

512px-Comet-Hale-Bopp-29-03-1997_hires_adj

Comet Hale-Bopp Attribution: Philipp Salzgeber / CC BY-SA 2.0 AT (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/at/deed.en)

 

Any War, Every War

affects

the heart and mind–

bodies weak, spirits dark

waiting for illumination,

succor

 

within

the downtrodden,

aided by the helpers–

they fight their own weariness, yet

they smile,

 

offer

hope like beacons–

fog lights glowing through murk,

beams cutting through storms, resisting

always

 

with deeds

as well as words

carried in their hearts–peace,

justice, truth, freedom–and then, hope

rising

 

rising

sun, moon, and stars

shoot through the sky, falling

in brilliant clouds, surrounding us

with light

 

and so,

we look again,

up to the sky, seeking

beauty, if not hope, shooting light

at us.

 

 

For Colleen’s Tanka Tuesday using the theme I chose, this quotation from The Merchant of Venice:

“How far that little candle throws his beams! So shines a good deed in a weary world.”William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice

This is a cinquain sequence where each stanza can stand alone, but also connects to form one poem. I’ve used the syllable/line form of a Crapsey Cinquain, though I don’t think the meter is right.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From Beneath

Screen Shot 2020-05-24 at 10.43.27 AM

 

From beneath,

under, and within

monsters come–

arising

from the depths they smile at you

offering you gifts

 

but light drifts,

blue-shifting nearer

in pinpricks

and glimmers

radiating from above,

brightening beauty, truth

 

is constant,

never ebbing or

flowing, though

it tumbles

blown by foul winds, yet always

seeking the surface.

 

A shadorma sequence for Colleen’s Tanka Tuesday prompt . This time, an ekphrastic challenge, using the photo above, supplied by Vashti Q. Vega.

It made me think of this song because my daughters used to go around singing it.

 

Circles

512px-Vassily_Kandinsky,_1926_-_Several_Circles,_Gugg_0910_25

Vassily Kandinsky, “Several Circles”

 

In transit

we wander, seeking

what? Circles

unbroken

form constants, our existence,

balanced symmetry–

 

light and dark

not opposites, but

shifted hues

shimmering

through time and space, reborn in

stars, flowers, the sea.

 

For Colleen’s Tanka Tuesday challenge, a shadorma sequence, using synonyms for the words Kerfe chose, transition and harmony. I hadn’t intended to write about circles, but since Kerfe and I seem stuck on them, I suppose it’s not unexpected.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gogyohka for River Ghosts

Ghost Chairs 95780824_3273532359326671_1829599761074749440_o

 

Abandoned garden–

ghosts in dusty grass

sit still in the long ago,

a gull’s laugh breaks the silence. . .

echoes

 

echoes

over the river,

through the thin spaces

of cloud-light whispers,

spring-scented rain falls

 

For Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday. I think these poems stand alone, but they can also be read together. I wrote the first one to go with the photo, but then then I had more to say.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Circles

Puddle Reflection May 2020

Puddle Reflection, May 2020. Upside down world, fleeting or timeless?

 

And after,

do the birds still sing–

the bardo

in-between

past and future, everything

rippling, light circles

 

to before,

the after, before

time begins,

radiant

waves humming—the sound of dreams–

forever’s spindrift.

 

A shadorma sequence for Colleen’s challenge because she admired this photo I took during a morning walk when I got caught in the rain. The challenge theme is “the day after,” chosen by Elizabeth of Tea & Paper. Also, this is Colleen’s 175th poetry challenge!