From Beneath

Screen Shot 2020-05-24 at 10.43.27 AM

 

From beneath,

under, and within

monsters come–

arising

from the depths they smile at you

offering you gifts

 

but light drifts,

blue-shifting nearer

in pinpricks

and glimmers

radiating from above,

brightening beauty, truth

 

is constant,

never ebbing or

flowing, though

it tumbles

blown by foul winds, yet always

seeking the surface.

 

A shadorma sequence for Colleen’s Tanka Tuesday prompt . This time, an ekphrastic challenge, using the photo above, supplied by Vashti Q. Vega.

It made me think of this song because my daughters used to go around singing it.

 

Gogyohka for River Ghosts

Ghost Chairs 95780824_3273532359326671_1829599761074749440_o

 

Abandoned garden–

ghosts in dusty grass

sit still in the long ago,

a gull’s laugh breaks the silence. . .

echoes

 

echoes

over the river,

through the thin spaces

of cloud-light whispers,

spring-scented rain falls

 

For Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday. I think these poems stand alone, but they can also be read together. I wrote the first one to go with the photo, but then then I had more to say.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poem up in Ekphrastic Review

512px-Johannes_Vermeer_-_Woman_Holding_a_Balance_-_Google_Art_Project

Johannes Vermeer, “Woman Holding a Balance”

 

I’m pleased that my small poem, “In the Balance,”  was among those selected as a response to the Vermeer painting “Woman Holding a Balance” for the most recent challenge in the Ekphrastic Review. My thanks to editor Lorette C. Luzajic for choosing my poem, along with such excellent poems and short prose pieces.  You can read them all here.

The Artist Says: NaPoWriMo2020, Day 6

1024px-The_Garden_of_Earthly_Delights_by_Bosch_High_Resolution

Bosch, The Garden of Earthly Delights

 

I paint what I see—

the tree-man’s visions,

 

pictures of what was,

of what might be,

 

wondering if once opened,

my mind-doors can be closed–

 

I have no answers,

this may be a chimera, after all–

 

but do take a strawberry,

they’re delicious, yes?

 

Day 6 of NaPoWriMois an ekphrastic prompt:

a poem from the point of view of one person/animal/thing from Hieronymous Bosch’s famous (and famously bizarre) triptych The Garden of Earthly Delights. Whether you take the position of a twelve-legged clam, a narwhal with a cocktail olive speared on its horn, a man using an owl as a pool toy, or a backgammon board being carried through a crowd by a fish wearing a tambourine on its head, I hope that you find the experience deliriously amusing. And if the thought of speaking in the voice of a porcupine-as-painted-by-a-man-who-never-saw-one leaves you cold, perhaps you might write from the viewpoint of Bosch himself? Very little is known about him, so there’s plenty of room for invention, embroidery, and imagination.

I’ve combined this prompt with the  dVerse  prompt, where De has asked us to write a quadrille(a poem of 44 words) using the word “close,” or some form of the word.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Connected: NaPoWriMo, Day 2

 

Painting by Sylvia L. Schreiber

 

Clouds, charcoal and white,

are fringed with a golden glow,

tumbling like puppies at play, fake-ferocious,

and without stop

until they drop,

exhausted, to lull with doggy grins

 

over gray-green Atlantic waves

that echo their play—

here the whole world sways–

and the gulls cry in syncopated beats

completing the symphony of breeze and sea–

 

steady breaths,

in and out

 

as the amber beach grass dances

and the wind brushes my cheek

in a salty kiss, a tingle, a promise

in this mystique

of what is, was, and might be—

 

everything luminous, electric,

connected,

alive.

 

For Day 2 of NaPoWriMo. The prompt was: to “write a poem about a specific place —  a particular house or store or school or office. Try to incorporate concrete details, like street names, distances (“three and a half blocks from the post office”), the types of trees or flowers, the color of the shirts on the people you remember there.”

I chose to write a poem based on a place in a painting that my mother painted. I have no idea if it is an actual place she visited, or when she painted it. The figure is kind of odd, but I’m captivated by the movement of clouds, waves, and grass, and well, this probably isn’t a finished poem either.

I’m also linking this to dVerse’s Open Link Night, where Grace is hosting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Measure of Tears

 

Michael_E._Arth__Moscow_Metro__oil_painting,_1980

“Moscow Metro” by Michael E. Arth (via Wikipedia Commons)

 

Her stoic mother kissed her,

the day the man took her away,

Smolensk to Moscow, a measure of tears

 

that never flowed for the Motherland–

there is duty, and there is love–she remembered

her stoic mother kissed her–

 

not the first time, but definitely the last,

while the embarrassed sun sulked behind the clouds

the day the man took her away

 

to that gated place. She learned to dissemble–and excelled–

yet inside a child remained, hurting–

Smolensk to Moscow, a measure of tears.

 

A wisp of a story in a cascade poem for Jane Dougherty’s prompt, using the above image, Moscow Metro by Michael E. Arth, as inspiration. I picked Smolensk because that’s where the character Elizabeth Jennings came from on the show, The Americans.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In a Dream I Found you

Odilon_Redon_-_Béatrice

Odilon Redon, “Béatrice”

“All that we see or seem

Is but a dream within a dream.”

–Edgar Allan Poe, “A Dream Within a Dream”

 

In a dream, I found you

there, not as I knew you,

but aglow,

 

your spirit gilding your face,

and through the mist,

you reached, took my hand,

 

and gazed at me with sea-green eyes

and led me to a sailing raft

and there reclined with me.

 

Then, under blossoming clouds–

scarlet, gold, and sapphire–

we sailed into the infinite,

 

a thousand tomorrows waited.

But I awoke,

my face salty only with tears

 

and longed to sleep

and dream again and again

and forever of you.

 

Odilon_Redon_-_Flower_Clouds_-_Google_Art_Project

Odilon Redon, “Flower Clouds”

 

Lillian has asked us to write a poem about dreams at dVerse today.  I think I probably write about dreams often, but these two paintings popped into my head. Can you have an ekphrastic poem based on two sources?

 

 

With a Bang Comes Possibility

landscape-4518195_640

Image by enriquelopezgarre from Pixabay

with a bang

comes the birth of worlds

and star songs

drift, falling

to papaya glow, rising

over barren rocks

 

then soaring

above burnished crags

the black-winged

dreamers fly,

carrying all the befores

and all the afters

 

landing here

where light and shadows

together

dance, holding

possibility aloft

for millennia.

 

A shadorma sequence for Colleen’s Tanka Tuesday. The poem is inspired by the image  above chosen by Linda Lee Lyberg.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Lesson

512px-Gowy-icaro-prado

 

I look at the painting. Is it a lesson about hubris? Or that children must make their own mistakes? All I see is father and son, horror and grief.

 

and now your feathers

nicked and torn, you soared too close

bewitched by the sun

 

A haibun quadrille (a poem of 44 words) for dVerse, where De has asked us to use the word “nick.” And also, for Colleen’s Tanka Tuesday, using synonyms for enchant and fly.