Peace Dream

“Imagine all the people

Living life in peace”

–John Lennon, “Imagine.”

When I was young,

maybe seven or eight,

I went to bed one night,

and dreamt about The Mummy,

Boris Karloff with his shuffling gait,

walking in my backyard

trailing bands of white linen

arms outstretched,

a nightmare image,

but somehow then, my dreamself knew,

I could change the story.

And so, in my dream world

that mummy played ball with me.

Standing in my backyard tossing it gently,

he cracked a smile

beneath his layered wrappings.

Now I wish I had that power

to change the world I see,

to turn bombs and guns

into birds and flowers,

to turn darkness to light,

to change hate

into love.

Animated_dove_holding_an_olive_branch

By Ayuugyi (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

 

 

Stone of Peace

 

 

I wished upon a stone so blue

I whispered love, return to me

Then I threw it, and it flew

Across the waves, down to the sea

 

I whispered love, return to me

When geese fly south in feathered Vs

Across the waves, down to the sea

Soft winds sigh with my pleas

 

When geese fly south in feathered Vs

Then might war end and cease to be

Soft winds sigh with my pleas

Why can’t we learn how to agree?

 

Then war might end and cease to be

More guns, more hate is not the way

Why can’t we learn how to agree?

Why must we blame them and they?

 

More guns, more hate is not the way

No need for thundering cannons’ rattle

Why must we blame them and they?

In sorrow, I watched you leave for battle

 

On that bright, smooth shore, I stood awhile

Then I threw it, and it flew,

I thought reflected there I saw your smile

As I wished upon a stone so blue

 

This poem is a Pantoum in response to Jane Dougherty’s poetry challenge using the photo above and these words: Bright, smooth, shore, blue, reflecting. A Pantoum is a series of quatrains with the second and fourth lines becoming the first and third lines in the next quatrain. The first line of the poem becomes the final line, and the third line of the poem becomes the second line of the final quatrain. First and third lines rhyme, and second and fourth lines rhyme. Got it?  Here is a better description.